What Is A General Plan?!?

Posted here: January 12, 2021

Created by Tomboy Dru November 10, 2018 via YouTube

With the City of Sacramento working on updating the City General Plan, we thought we would post this fantastic video created by YouTube creator Tomboy Dru, who humorously breaks down what’s in a General Plan, by providing a general explanation of each General Plan element. These elements include land use, environmental resources, recreation and open space, noise, circulation or mobility, safety, energy, and housing or growth area. We highly recommend this video to gain an understanding of this important document, or to refresh your knowledge! Check out her channel for other great urban planning content, as well!


Click here to learn more about the City of Sacramento’s General Plan.

Click here to learn more about the County of Sacramento’s General Plan.

To learn about the general plan where you live, visit your local government websites.

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Metropolitan Transportation Plan Update

On November 7, 2019, the Environmental Council of Sacramento (ECOS) submitted comments on the recently proposed update to our region’s Metropolitan Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (MTP/SCS). These comments were submitted via one letter solely from ECOS, and a joint letter from both ECOS and 350 Sacramento. Below is an excerpt from our comments, followed by links to PDFs of both letters.

The Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG) has put forth a sophisticated Metropolitan Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (MTP/SCS), a regional plan that the region’s jurisdictions should follow. While this regional plan is not a strong as we feel it could be, the 2020 MTP/SCS is a viable strategy for the region to meet its regional greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets mandated by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) per Senate Bill 375 (2008).

The plan represents a reasonable compromise between what the region could accomplish if the political will existed, and the reality of much more expansive car-oriented, low-density growth that is actually being actively pursued by some of the region’s jurisdictions on the ground. ECOS would prefer a greater percentage of transportation investment to non-auto modes, and a much more compact land use footprint than proposed. The Sacramento region is not meeting its mandated GHG reduction targets because local jurisdictions are not complying with the strategy that SACOG has laid out for them, and the State must do more to ensure compliance of local authorities to our Sustainable Community Strategies, as well as to ensure the State’s own investments are aligned with its climate laws.

Click here to read the comment letter by ECOS on the MTP/SCS.

Click here to read the comment letter by ECOS and 350 Sacramento on the Climate Change section of the MTP/SCS, which was submitted separately.

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