Judge rejects San Diego County’s climate action plan

By Richard Allyn, Reporter

Posted: Dec 28, 2018 9:40 PM PST
Updated: Dec 28, 2018 10:53 PM PST

CBS 8 San Diego

SAN DIEGO (NEWS 8) – Environmental activists are calling on San Diego County leaders to adopt a new climate action plan.

For the third time, a judge Friday rejected San Diego County’s plan, saying it doesn’t comply with goals for reduced emissions. It was a ruling that environmental leaders praised and they used the moment to urge the County Board of Supervisors to create a comprehensive climate action plan.

The new court ruling found that San Diego County’s climate action plan fails to comply with its own and the state’s goals of cutting back on carbon emissions. The judge rejected the county’s proposal to use carbon credits from out of the county or out of the country, saying that offsetting greenhouse gas emissions in other parts of the world does nothing to help us here at home.

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Creating Sustainable Communities and Landscapes

Recommended practices and tools for local collaboration on climate-smart growth

Published: October 8, 2018

By the Strategic Growth Council

The State of California has a rich history of environmental leadership. With some of the most beautiful landscapes and fertile soils in the country, we have much to protect and conserve. As the State’s population grows towards fifty million people, infrastructure demands place intensified levels of stress on California’s agricultural and natural wealth. In order to address these challenges, California has led the charge nationally to reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions, because we recognize that this battle is not only about the environment – it is also about protecting the well-being of our families and communities. To ensure the prosperous future of our State, we must shift to a more conscientious approach to land use planning in California – one that balances the needs of conservation and development. In order to balance these priorities, the State has put new laws in place for new housing and infill development, community resilience, economic growth in urban and rural areas, and set an ambitious target for carbon neutrality by 2045 that relies upon efficient and orderly growth across California.

Developed through a collaboration among the Strategic Growth Council, the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research and the California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions (CALAFCO), this paper is intended to help support coordination among local entities to advance efficient growth and conservation of natural resources. The document highlights case studies in which LAFCos, cities, counties and special districts successfully partnered to reduce suburban sprawl and increase the conservation of natural and working lands, while also considering how to improve community resilience. It also aims to raise awareness of available tools and resources that can be used to create more environmentally and economically sustainable communities throughout California.

California, State of. “AnnouncementCreating Sustainable Communities and Landscapes: Recommended Practices and Tools for Local Collaboration on Climate-Smart Growth.” CA.gov, Strategic Growth Council, 8 Oct. 2018, www.sgc.ca.gov/news/2018/10-08.html.

Read the paper by clicking here.

Elk Grove Sphere of Influence

Elk Grove SOI

Elk Grove SOI map

Location of the proposed expansion of the Elk Grove Sphere of Influence. Click on image to view full size.

Resources

  • FAQs: Sphere of Influence (SOI).
  • Final EIR: Revisions and corrections to the Recirculated Draft Environmental Impact Report for Elk Grove’s Proposed SOI Amendment (Sept. 27, 2013).
  • Comment letter in response to the Final EIR (November 4, 2013).
  • Draft EIR: Elk Grove Proposed Sphere of Influence Recirculated Draft EIR (March 21, 2013).
  • Comment letter in response to the Recirculated Draft EIR (May 20, 2013).
  • Article: “Elk Grove wants to expand its boundaries by 8,000 acres” (Sacramento Bee, Oct. 7, 2013).
  • Editorial: “Elk Grove should concentrate on jobs in its existing core” (Sacramento Bee, Sept. 25, 2013).
  • Editorial: “Elk Grove’s growth plan is an overreach” (Sacramento Bee, March 26, 2012).
  • Article: “Elk Grove’s proposal to expand encounters early questions” (Sacramento Bee, Apr. 7, 2012).

Elk Grove wants to expand its size by 30 percent

What’s really scary? Elk Grove wants to expand its size by 30 percent, with concrete covering the farmland and wildlife habitat south of the City. That is the plan that Elk Grove has submitted to the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCo), a little known public agency responsible for ensuring orderly development and protection of open space and farmland. You can help defeat this proposal and help LAFCo make better choices for our region. Check the LAFCo website for updates and sign up at the ECOS website for action alerts.

We need your help NOW!

LAFCo begins hearings soon on Elk Grove’s request to include 8,000 acres south of its current city limits within its Sphere of Influence. Approval would give the city a green light to annex and develop the land. This request is the largest urban expansion ever to come before LAFCo.

LAFCo staff recommendation includes a “Regional Enhanced Alternative,” which is a reduced footprint scenario for the SOI of 4000+ acres. Since there has been no demonstration of any need for expansion beyond current Elk Grove’s city limits to accommodate growth, ECOS remains in full opposition to the alternative recommendation as well.

Please send a letter or email to the Commissioners at:

Sacramento Local Agency Formation Commission.
1112 I Street, Suite 100 , Sacramento, CA 95814-2836
Fax: (916) 874.2939 Email: commissionclerk[at]saclafco[dot]org


Top Ten Reasons for Denying Elk Grove’s Overreach

By Rob Burness, ECOS Board member & Habitat 2020 Co-chair

Elk Grove’s leaders would have us believe they simply want to plan for their future and improve their job housing balance. Others have tried to characterize the issues as jobs vs. environment. But there is regional significance far beyond that simple calculus. Here are ten reasons why LAFCo should turn down Elk Grove’s overreaching request:Continue reading