Sacramento’s Air Quality: A Passing Grade

Post:     Sacramento Bee, Letters to the Editor, May 22, 2022

AQI PASSING GRADE

RE: “Sacramento among California cities with filthiest air in the US, new study says. What to know,” (sacbee.com, April 22)

The American Lung Association’s “State of the Air 2022” report does not specify that extreme but short-term impacts from wildfires cause high readings, resulting in a misleading picture of Sacramento’s air quality. Air quality and public health are absolutely impacted by wildfires, but to assign an “F” grade without naming the reason unnecessarily undermines public confidence and denies true progress tackling air and climate pollution. Thanks to innovative initiatives by the Sac Metro Air District and our regional partners and stringent rules and regulations, air quality in Sacramento (minus wildfires) has improved significantly over the past several decades and will continue to improve. Our region has made great strides in moving toward meeting strict health-based ambient air quality standards. That is no small feat for the public and private sectors and certainly worth a passing grade.

Dr. Alberto Ayala, Sacramento

https://www.sacbee.com/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/article261627617.html#storylink=cpy

Sacramento and smog: Your role in it, health risks and why it’s worse in the summer

By Brianna Taylor | May 9, 2022 | The Sacramento Bee

The list of health risks associated with ground-level ozone is a long one.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ground-level ozone is linked to diminished lung function, causing more hospital admissions and emergency room visits, and an increase in premature deaths. “The problem with ground-level ozone is that it causes inflammation in our airways, our trachea, in our sinuses and in our lungs,” Easter said. “The lung issue is probably the biggest of the issues because that affects our breathing and causes asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory impairments.”

Read more at: https://www.sacbee.com/news/environment/article261073407.html#storylink=cpy

ECOS Climate Committee 5/12 Focus on Transportation

ECOS Climate Change Committee – Focus on Transportation, THURSDAY, MAY 12 6:00 pm

Co-hosted by Ralph Propper, Climate Committee Chair and John Deeter, Transportation Team Lead

Agenda

6:00 Let’s chat — Zoom break-out rooms

6:05 Welcome and brief introductions

6:10 Sacramento Regional Transit (Sac RT) staff will discuss plans for the coming year. RT’s fiscal status has improved, as ridership is increasing again.

Craig Norman (Director of Engineering) will discuss more frequent service on Folsom line, electric buses, low-floor light rail stations/vehicles, new LRT stations (Dos Rios station; Horn Rd. station near Rancho Cordova’s Kassis property)

6:30 SacRT and TOD – Traci Canfield will provide high level overview of the SACOG-SACRT Transit-oriented Development Action Plan written in 2020

6:50 CapCity Freeway Lawsuit Update – Betsy Weiland of SARA (invited contributor) to discuss impacts to river

7:05 Transportation Ballot Measure for November election – Steve Cohn of SacMoves (invited contributor)

7:20 UPDATES

  • Climate Action Plans for County and City of Sacramento
  • For July presentation — Valley Rail, San Joaquin JPA, by Dan Leavitt, Manager of Regional Initiatives, will update us on the Stockton to Sacramento segment of Valley Rail w/maps, station areas, station designs. Valley Rail is on the Sacramento Subdivision from Stockton to Natomas — on separate, parallel UP track(s) to Sac RT from Cosumnes River Blvd to R Street in Midtown. Service will extend to Natomas (Elkhorn Blvd), but planning work is being done with Butte CAG and SACOG for a future extension to Butte County (Chico).

7:30 Adjourn

Thursday, May 12, 2022, 6:00pm

Link to join: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/6656164155

To phone in: 669-900-6833, Meeting ID: 665 616 4155

California Energy Commission Opportunities

Greetings!

The California Energy Commission has two great opportunities for individuals looking to engage with their communities:

1. If you’re interested in advancing energy equity and environmental justice, please consider joining the Disadvantaged Communities Advisory Group (DACAG)!

a. The DACAG was created by Senate Bill 350 and is the principal advisory body for the CEC and California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) and advises the agencies regarding the development, implementation, and impacts of clean energy and transportation programs in disadvantaged communities.

b. More information about the DACAG and how to join can be found in the attached PDF titled, “DACAG Solicitation 20220411,” or on the CPUC’s DACAG webpage and the CEC’s DACAG webpage.

2. If you’re interested in transportation efforts, please consider joining the CEC’s Clean Transportation Program (CTP) Advisory Committee!

a. CTP Advisory Committee Members will provide input on the development of the Clean Transportation Program Investment Plan, which establishes program priorities and funding allocations.

b. More information on how to join the Advisory Committee can be found in this PDF titled, “Notice of Opportunity to Serve on the Investment Plan Advisory Committee of the Clean Transportation Program”

Office of the Public Advisor, Energy Equity, and Tribal Affairs
California Energy Commission
Office: (916) 957-7910
Email: publicadvisor[at]energy[dot]ca[dot]gov
Web: https://www.energy.ca.gov/about/divisions-and-offices/office-public-advisor

California Energy Commission
715 P Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

Big Day of Giving 2022

ECOS: Through education, advocacy, and litigation, we seek to help the Sacramento region meet its climate goals and shift its land use and transportation patterns to create a transit-connected network of sustainable, sociable, affordable, and equitable communities.

The Environmental Council of Sacramento is a powerful advocacy organization in the Sacramento region for over 50 years, arguing for transit-oriented development and against greenfield sprawl, to protect our habitat, and clean up our air. With the climate crisis growing and affordable housing a critical need, our advocacy efforts are needed more than ever. Please donate and join. Make a difference with us!

Can we count on you?

Big Day of Giving, the Sacramento region’s largest annual event to support the causes we care most about, is on now. Between now and May 5, please give to ECOS.

Big Day of Giving helps non-profits like ECOS raise much needed funds — mostly in small gifts — proving that when we all give a little, we can make a big difference.

For as little as $40, you can help us reach our fundraising goal of $10,000 which will allow us to continue studying and taking positions on regional and local issues — climate change, land use, transportation, green building, habitat, and water. Also, your gift will help ECOS build its next generation of leaders – we seek young people who recognize the dangers of climate change and want to do something about it.

Make a gift today or mark your calendar for Thursday, May 5 to be a part of this historic day of philanthropy.

Check out some of our activities

  • ECOS Orientation via Zoom on May 5 at 6 pm; contact office[at]sacramento[dot]net
  • Sacramento Earth Day on April 24 – https://www.ecosacramento.net/sacearthday/
  • SacCounty District 5 Candidate Forum on April 26 – https://youtu.be/EFvJfZEY3oo
  • Climate Action materials and Committee Chair Ralph Propper rpropper47[at]icloud[dot]com
  • Field trips – salmon spawning habitat in American River; sandhill cranes at Woodbridge Ecological Reserve in Oct 2021 and Jan 2022.

MAKE A GIFT to ECOS for the BIG DAY OF GIVING

Third Act Sacramento Gets Boomers Involved in Climate Fight

By Hannah Holzer | March 27, 2022 | The Sacramento Bee

Sacramento facilitators Ferris and Laurie Litman have wholeheartedly committed the third acts of their own lives – post-retirement – to climate activism. Both worry about the futures their children and grandchildren will face. Litman says the fact that young people have inherited a planet polluted by older generations is “an intergenerational injustice.” “This is the most important thing people my age can be doing,” Litman said. “We overconsumed. We’ve taken a lot, and now we’re leaving a depauperate future for our kids.”

Sacramento’s Third Act working group is still in its early days, but as it grows, so does excitement about the future. The group meets virtually on the third Monday of each month at 6 p.m. and anyone who lives in or around the Sacramento region is encouraged to get involved by emailing thirdactsac[at]gmail[dot]com. Fighting a planetary crisis on a personal scale can feel futile. But people of every generation must do everything in our power to ensure a livable future.

Read more at: https://www.sacbee.com/article259152778.html#storylink=cpy