Sacramento moves forward with zoning change

January 19, 2021 | By Theresa Clift | The Sacramento Bee

Good news!

The Sacramento City Council took a step Tuesday toward becoming one of the first cities in the country to eliminate traditional single-family zoning.

The change, for which the council unanimously signaled support, would allow houses across the city to contain up to four dwelling units. City officials said the proposal would help the city alleviate its housing crisis, as well as achieve equity goals, by making neighborhoods with high-performing schools, pristine parks and other amenities accessible for families who cannot afford the rising price tags to buy homes there.

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City of Sacramento General Plan

January 19, 2021

Board President of the Environmental Council of Sacramento, Ralph Propper, submitted the following comments to the City of Sacramento regarding agenda item 15 at their January 19 meeting: 2040 General Plan Update – Draft Land Use Map, Proposed Roadway Changes, and other Key Strategies. Comments are as follows.

The Environmental Council of Sacramento urges prompt action to implement the recommendations of the Mayors’ Commission on Climate Change into the city’s Climate Action and Adaptation Plan. Our Climate Action goals can only be reached by encouraging transit-oriented, infill development. Therefore, ECOS supports the proposal to allow duplexes, triplexes and fourplexes in Single Family zones, which will permit a greater array of housing options in existing single-unit neighborhoods.

– Ralph Propper, ECOS President

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Sacramento has a plan to address its housing crisis. Some neighborhoods are fighting it

By Theresa Clift | January 10, 2021 | The Sacramento Bee

Sacramento is in a seemingly untenable housing crisis, and city officials have proposed a change to the zoning code to encourage more housing by allowing duplexes, triplexes and four-plexes to be built in neighborhoods currently zoned for single-family homes. The change would improve equity, city leaders say, by providing housing for low- and moderate-income families in neighborhoods with nice parks, high-performing schools and other amenities.

But the proposal has sparked a conflict that has galvanized some of the city’s wealthiest – and most influential – neighborhoods behind a common cause, pitting those communities against affordable housing advocates and some members of the City Council.

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