Jackson Township DEIR Comments

On October 31, 2019, Environmental Council of Sacramento (ECOS), Habitat 2020, 350 Sacramento, and Sierra Club provided comments on the Jackson Township Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR). Below are some excerpts from the letter, followed by a link to the letter in full.

Agricultural Resources

There is insufficient mitigation for farmland lost in the Jackson Township Specific Plan DEIR [Draft Environmental Impact Report]. By converting all this farmland to urban/suburban uses, the GHG emissions will increase due to the increased number of motor vehicle trips (more vehicle miles traveled). Moreover, loss of agricultural resources will reduce the potential for carbon sequestration in the soil by application of compost or regenerative agriculture methods, in addition to the natural processes of plant growth and soil microbial action from farming. There needs to be better mitigation measures to ensure carbon soil sequestration occurs at least as much as it would if the agricultural resources were preserved.

Biological Resources

Use of the South Sacramento Habitat Conservation Plan (SSHCP) was offered as one of the options for dealing with California Endangered Species Act (CESA) and Federal Endangered Species Act (FESA) impacts, and it was clearly stated that the hardline preserves identified in the SSHCP conservation strategy would be provided. Since the SSHCP now has its permits and is in the implementation phase, we are assuming that the Jackson Township will be affected by and compliant with the SSHCP.

Climate Change

We appreciate the opportunity to comment on Chapter 9, “Climate Change”, of the County’s Jackson Township Specific Plan Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR). Our greenhouse gas (GHG)-related comments are presented in the following seven sections. We first discuss the County’s past GHG-reduction commitments, because the DEIR:
I. does not accurately describe County climate planning;
II. uses inappropriate baseline data based on past planning;
III. applies inappropriate thresholds of significance; and
IV. is inconsistent with the County’s 2011 General Plan Update, associated Final Environmental Report (GP/FEIR), and Phase 1 CAP.
We also present,
V. other DEIR-related concerns.
We conclude:
VI. the DEIR is legally insufficient
VII. the County’s failure to provide promised mitigation is contrary to the General Plan.

Click here to read the letter in full
Attachment 1
Attachment 2
Attachment 3
Attachment 4
Attachment 5

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Get involved in plans for I-80 and Hwy 65 Transportation Corridors

Posted October 15, 2019

Get involved in the future of the I-80 / Business 80 corridor from downtown Sacramento to Auburn and the Highway 65 corridor from Lincoln to I-80. The effort will result in a multi-modal plan that considers improvements to vehicle, truck, rail, bus, pedestrian, and bicycle travel along the corridor, with an emphasis on increasing travel choices to reduce congestion.

Learn more and join the conversation on Monday, October 28 from 5:00 – 6:30 p.m. for the second Placer Sacramento Gateway Plan Community Workshop. A brief presentation will begin at 5:45 p.m. Stop by anytime between 5:00 and 6:30 p.m. to hear a project update!

Can’t make it to the workshop? Go to http://bit.ly/more80choices for a livestream of the presentation.

Click here to RSVP.

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Problems with Galt Climate Action Plan

On September 30, 2019, the Environmental Council of Sacramento, 350 Sacramento and the Sierra Club submitted a letter compiling comments on the Climate Action Plan proposed by the City of Galt.

Below are some excerpts from the letter.

Local climate action is important because the largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), in the City of Galt as well as statewide, are building energy [use] and on-road vehicle travel.
Both are best and most directly controlled locally, by adopting energy-efficient building codes and requiring efficient development that reduces the need for auto “vehicle miles traveled” (VMT).

There is no longer any rational doubt that climate change is adversely affecting the livability of our planet now; that physical environmental effects will grow increasingly serious in coming decades; and that without major, timely GHG-reductions, they will cause grave public health impacts and severe economic and social disruptions in the lifetimes of children alive today.
We appreciate the difficulties transitioning from the long-accustomed land use and building models that have contributed to climate change to sustainable ones, and doing it quickly. But the exigencies of climate change, as reflected in State law, require broad and decisive change in how we use and think about energy. The required adjustments will bring many co-benefits, and we no longer have the luxury of delayed or token efforts.
Our organizations are committed to working with Galt in every productive way we can. We look forward to ongoing engagement in the City’s administrative process and may provide specific suggestions in future comments

Click here to read the comment letter in full.

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