Summer Days Often Feel Much Hotter If You Live In One Of California’s Historically Redlined Neighborhoods

May 26, 2020 | By Randol White | Capital Public Radio

California’s triple-digit heat is back — and new research shows residents in the state’s most underserved neighborhoods suffer the most when the mercury rises.

Portland State University’s heat-mapping project tapped volunteers last summer in four California metro areas to attach GPS-equipped temperature collection gadgets to their cars and drive along set routes for an hour in the morning, afternoon and evening. They drove through the Bay Area, Los Angeles, Victorville and Sacramento.

The research project was led by Vivek Shandas, a professor who believes this form of heat-data collection can help city planners solve decades-old problems.

“We’re trying to bring the understanding of climate change and the changes happening on a planetary scale down to the individual person and down to the individual city block,” Shandas said.

The data collected that day indicates the temperature differentials between neighborhoods can vary by as much as 20 degrees.

Wealthy, tree-canopied neighborhoods are typically cooler, and low-income, asphalt-heavy communities run hotter.

Click here to read the full article.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels.

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Stockton Blvd Transportation Study

Do you walk, bike, take transit, or drive on Stockton Boulevard?

Help choose which features will be used to improve Stockton Boulevard from Alhambra Boulevard to 47th Avenue in the City of Sacramento!

City transportation planners have just launched a survey to hear what features residents would like to see on this roughly four-mile stretch of Stockton Boulevard in southeastern Sacramento.

The City of Sacramento has created some options that aim to improve safety and mobility for people using all modes of transportation. They need to get opinions from YOU, the people who walk, bike, take transit, and drive on Stockton Boulevard.

Thank you in advance for your input! This survey will take approximately 5 minutes. Also available in Spanish or Vietnamese.

Deadline: June 30, 2020

Click here for the City’s announcement of this survey.

Click here to learn more about the the Stockton Boulevard Corridor Study.

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Why the 1st Earth Day was a Success

April 10, 2020
Op-Ed by Denis Hayes
The Seattle Times

Author Denis Hayes was one of the organizers of the first Earth Day in 1970. The first thing to know about the beginning of Earth Day is that the big win wasn’t establishing Earth Day itself, but bringing the same organizing skills to the 1970 November elections.

“That November political triumph made clear to Congress that Earth Day had not been just a frolic in the park. One month after the 1970 election, the Clean Air Act of 1970 passed the Senate unanimously and the House with just one dissenting vote.

In short order, Congress also passed the:

• Clean Water Act

• Occupational Health and Safety Act

• Marine Mammal Protection Act

• Endangered Species Act

• Safe Drinking Water Act

• Set Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFÉ) standards for cars

• Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act

• Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

• Toxic Substances Control Act

• National Forest Management Act

In the 10 years following Earth Day, bold new laws changed the direction of the United States economy more profoundly than any other period in history, except perhaps the New Deal. And the New Deal was pushed by a wildly popular president whose party controlled both houses of Congress. The environmental revolution came from the grassroots up.”

Click here to read the full article.

Photo from University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability, via flickr.com.

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