SIWD Community Workshop 1/25/2024

Thursday, January 25, 2024, 5:30 – 7pm

SIWD PRESENTS: Community Benefits Agreement Presentation
Join Sacramento Investment Without Displacement to learn more about the work we have done around Community Benefits Agreements (CBA) and how they have significantly impacted other cities.

SIWD has been working with City of Sacramento Staff to implement a CBA ordinance. We will also give an update on where we are in this process. We will also discuss how residents and community members can join us and provide feedback and information.

The meeting will be virtual both on Facebook Live and Zoom.

To Attend our Virtual Meeting please register in the link: https://bit.ly/4agkcWO.

2023 Annual Highlights

December 21, 2023

Dear ECOS Community,

ECOS and our members and partners accomplished a lot this year and our advocacy mattered.

This year we celebrated the 50th Anniversary of ECOS at our Environmentalist Awards on Dec. 1st at the State Railroad Museum. We send heartfelt thanks to our sponsors; we could not do our work without you. We also thank our ECOS team that made it happen. See photos and more information on the last page of our Annual Highlights report.

Throughout our history, ECOS has addressed environmental challenges in our region, and contributed to several successful planning actions, three of which remain a focus of ECOS today – the Sacramento Area Council of Governments Blueprint, the Sacramento County Urban Services Boundary, and the Natomas Basin Habitat Conservation Plan. Read about them in the report.

For more perspective on the period 1970 to today, see our video, ECOS Past & Present – Key Events, and History of ECOS.

Download ECOS’ 2023 Annual Highlights

Much work lies ahead. Please join our ranks, donate, or become a member here.

Best wishes for the new year.

Susan Herre

President of the Board of Directors

2040 General Plan Update: Missing Middle Housing & Maximum Floor Area Ratio

On November 28, 2023, ECOS submitted a letter of support for the City of Sacramento’s proposal for the missing middle housing ordinance as part of the General Plan Update. Below is an excerpt from our letter.

For over 50 years, ECOS has urged our region to increase infill housing as opposed to sprawl development, in order to preserve habitat and make our air healthier to breathe. More recently it has become clear that this is needed to limit greenhouse gas emissions that jeopardize the future of our species, and to deal with our #1 local issue: the lack of affordable housing and concomitant homelessness. For these reasons, ECOS has consistently promoted investment in public transit and light rail, and the development of transit-oriented infill development. Additionally, ECOS recognizes that our past discriminatory housing policy has caused a development pattern that must be adjusted to promote environmental justice and equity.

Click here to read our letter in full.

The widening of I-80 works against California’s climate goals 

By Stephen M. Wheeler and Barbara Leary, Special to the Bee | October 17, 2023 | The Sacramento Bee

If we want to know why our state’s transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions have risen since the early 2010s, a good place to look is Caltrans. The agency has long been fixated on widening roads and creating “induced demand” which has led to more driving. Currently, this cycle continues through the agency’s questionable efforts to create additional lanes on the I-80 Yolo Bypass causeway leading into Sacramento. And recently, a high-level administrator was demoted after attempting to stop such actions.

Read more at: https://www.sacbee.com/opinion/op-ed/article280482349.html#storylink=cpy

Press Release: ECOS launches campaign to save wildlife habitat and farmland in Natomas, Sept 11, 2023

“We think the annual Farm to Fork month, with so many people celebrating the locally grown food in the region, is a perfect time to highlight how important farms are to people and wildlife.” stated Heather Fargo, former Mayor of Sacramento and lead of the Natomas Campaign for the Environmental Council of Sacramento (ECOS).

ECOS is calling on the public to protect Natomas open space and embarking on a major campaign to educate the community about how important the Natomas farmlands and open space are to wildlife in our region and beyond. Natomas is a special place; it is a vital part of the Pacific Flyway and home to 22 protected species, in addition to providing food for our region and the world.

The Natomas Basin Habitat Conservation Plan was established in 1997 to ensure the basin’s natural resources are not lost with the growth of the Natomas community. Unfortunately, loss of these resources is likely to happen because of proposed residential and industrial development projects covering more than 8,200 acres of land intended to remain in agriculture.

The first of those projects is the Airport South Industrial Project, a 450-acre warehouse district proposed for land south of I-5 and adjacent to the West Lake neighborhood in North Natomas. If approved, it would put over 6 million square feet of warehouses on foraging habitat for the endangered Swainson’s Hawk.

“ECOS wants Sacramento to remember the value of open space and farmland as a way to support wildlife and combat climate change. We Sacramentans have a role in protecting one of the Earth’s biodiversity hotspots,” said Fargo.

A new message is on display on a digital billboard along I-5 in downtown Sacramento. It has a simple message – save Sacramento’s wildlife habitat and farmland.

Targeted to those who enjoy the local dining experience offered in the city, it simply says, ““There’s no Farm to Fork without farms” and “Natomas farmlands feed people and wildlife”.

The billboard is timed to coincide with the annual Farm to Fork Festival that includes the Tower Bridge dinner and the street festival on Capital Mall on Sept 22-23.

The billboard kicks off a major new campaign by ECOS, continuing its 50 years of efforts to protect the environment.

“The establishment of the Natomas Basin Habitat Conservation Plan was important for regional sustainability thirty years ago. Now with climate change, it is essential that we stop sprawl and protect biodiversity in this area. The NBHCP provided for development on 17, 500 acres, and the proposed projects are outside of that,” said Susan Herre AIA AICP, President of the ECOS Board of Directors.
ECOS is partnering with Sierra Club, Habitat 2020, Audubon Society, Friends of the Swainson’s Hawk and California Native Plant Society.

Map of the Natomas Basin The proposed projects are in red and are labelled.

More information is available on the ECOS website – https://www.ecosacramento.net/

Contacts: Heather Fargo, former Mayor of Sacramento, ECOS Natomas Team Lead: h-fargo[at]comcast[dot]net, (916) 600-6615; and Susan Herre, President of ECOS Board, susanherre[at]gmail[dot]com

The ECOS Mission: Our mission is to achieve regional sustainability, livable communities, environmental justice, and a healthy environment and economy for existing and future residents. ECOS strives to bring positive change to the Sacramento region by proactively working with the individual and organizational members of ECOS, neighborhood groups, and local and regional governments.

Click here for a PDF of this Press Release.