“The promise and pitfalls of Aggie Square in Oak Park”

By Graham Womack
April 1, 2020
Sacramento News and Review

“The reality is Aggie Square could be the best thing for the neighborhood, and it could be the worst thing for the neighborhood,” said Sacramento City Council member Eric Guerra, whose district is directly east of UC Davis Med Center.

https://sacblog.newsreview.com/2020/04/01/innovation-without-gentrification/

Even a UC Davis official—Hendry Ton, the university’s associate vice chancellor for health equity, diversity and inclusion—has questions about Aggie Square causing gentrification and displacing residents.
“I think there’s a lot of questions about that and I certainly have questions about that as well,” Ton said. “I think that the potential is that if the people in Aggie Square and the university are thoughtful and careful and collaborative about this, this can be a very significant force for good in the neighborhood.”
So far, however, collaboration hasn’t exactly been smooth, with officials and residents clashing on plans to ensure the neighborhood benefits from the project.
A group connected to the California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities initiative, known as Sacramento Investment Without Displacement, has been working on a legally binding community benefits agreement for Aggie Square.
A January draft of the agreement called for local hiring from nearby zip codes, anti-demolition policies to protect homes and enrollment of at least 50 percent of Medi-Cal recipients living within five miles of Aggie Square.
“We believe that this project has a lot of potential to be successful. But it also has a lot of potential to displace working families.”
Gabby Trejo is executive director of Sacramento Area Congregations Together.
“We want to see Aggie Square be successful,” said Gabby Trejo, who has been working on the agreement and serves as executive director of Sacramento Area Congregations Together. “We believe that this project has a lot of potential to be successful. But it also has a lot of potential to displace working families. And we want to make sure that working families in our region are protected.”
City leaders have yet to commit to a community benefits agreement, however. Guerra and Councilman Jay Schenirer, who didn’t respond to a request for comment, are instead working on a letter of intent, which city leaders declined to provide.
“I’m less concerned about the type of document and more concerned about an honest agreement… that will last longer than whatever we call the agreement,” Guerra said.
But Trejo and Sasso said the letter is insufficient. “We’ve seen other folks be bad actors in that things are promised and then they’re never delivered,” Sasso said.

https://sacblog.newsreview.com/2020/04/01/innovation-without-gentrification/

Click here to read the full article.


ECOS’ Involvement

ECOS is a part of the Sacramento Investment Without Displacement coalition to work towards preventing the displacement of long-time residents and local businesses that could occur as a result of this significant, new project at the UC Davis Medical Center.

Click here to learn more about Aggie Square and ECOS’ involvement.


Image credit: Edna Winti, 2016/366/238 Proceed with Caution

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ECOS Board Meeting – Jan 28

You are invited to the ECOS Board Meeting on Tuesday, January 28th, 2020. All are welcome to join.

This month, we’ll have a special presentation by Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) staff on Strategies to Cool the Capital Region, and Community Air Protection.

  • Shelley Jiang will present SMAQMD’s just-completed Capitol Region heat island study: Cool roofs & pavements, tree canopy, electric vehicles, and smart growth can cool us!
  • Ashley Reynolds will discuss their Community Air Protection program, focusing on under-served communities.
  • A Question/Answer session with SMAQMD presenters will follow the presentation

Agenda

Click here to view the meeting agenda.

More Information

Click here to learn more about SMAQMD’s Community Air Protection Program.

Click here to learn more about the Capital Region Urban Heat Island Mitigation Project.

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How harmful are small, off-road engines?

December 23, 2019

On December 23, 2019 ECOS submitted a comment letter to the California Air Resource Board (CARB) regarding small off-road engines and their impacts on air quality. In our letter, we state:

We support the pursuit of alternatives and incentives to require the transition to zero emission technologies as soon as possible.

CARB research in 2018 found that long-term exposure to certain exhaust compounds emitted by gasoline powered lawn and garden equipment may increase cancer risk by up to 80 excess cases per one million operators exposed.

Click here to view the comment letter.

Click here to learn more about Small Off-Road Engines on the CARB site.

To keep up to date join this facebook group.

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