What Is A General Plan?!?

Posted here: January 12, 2021

Created by Tomboy Dru November 10, 2018 via YouTube

With the City of Sacramento working on updating the City General Plan, we thought we would post this fantastic video created by YouTube creator Tomboy Dru, who humorously breaks down what’s in a General Plan, by providing a general explanation of each General Plan element. These elements include land use, environmental resources, recreation and open space, noise, circulation or mobility, safety, energy, and housing or growth area. We highly recommend this video to gain an understanding of this important document, or to refresh your knowledge! Check out her channel for other great urban planning content, as well!


Click here to learn more about the City of Sacramento’s General Plan.

Click here to learn more about the County of Sacramento’s General Plan.

To learn about the general plan where you live, visit your local government websites.

Strong Mayor Measure Presentation

Tuesday 9/22 at 6pm on Zoom

Everyone is welcome to virtually join in on Tuesday 9/22 for a presentation on the 2020 Strong Mayor Measure at the ECOS Board Meeting!

  • Julia Burrows, Senior Policy Advisor to Sacramento Mayor Steinberg, will present for “Yes on Measure A”
  • Heather Fargo, former Sacramento Mayor, will present for “No on Measure A”
  • Followed by Q & A

Meeting starts at 6:00 pm | Tuesday, September 22, 2020
Zoom Meeting ID: 818 6537 7865
Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81865377865 | Call-in: 1-669-900-6833
ECOS Board Meetings are scheduled for the fourth Tuesday of odd-numbered months.

Here’s a link to the agenda: https://www.ecosacramento.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/bsk-pdf-manager/2020/09/2020-09-Sept-22-ECOS-Board-Meeting-Agenda.pdf

ECOS Board Meeting July 23rd

At this meeting, we will hear from Special Assistant Julia Burrows, the new senior policy advisor to Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg. She will share with us some insight into how the City of Sacramento is currently handling environmental concerns. This is also a chance to raise issues of which we think their office ought to be aware. Click here to learn more about Julia Burrows.

Date: Tuesday, July 23rd

Time: Reception is at 5:30 pm (feel free to bring something to share) and the meeting begins at 6:00 pm

Location: The meeting will be held in the Sierra Club CA conference room on the second floor of the Breathe CA building, at 909 12th Street, Sacramento. Ring the buzzer for Sierra Club to be let in. Street parking is difficult, but lightrail stops right by the office and there is secure bike parking inside the building.

Click here to see the agenda.

We look forward to seeing everyone!

Creating Sustainable Communities and Landscapes

Recommended practices and tools for local collaboration on climate-smart growth

Published: October 8, 2018

By the Strategic Growth Council

The State of California has a rich history of environmental leadership. With some of the most beautiful landscapes and fertile soils in the country, we have much to protect and conserve. As the State’s population grows towards fifty million people, infrastructure demands place intensified levels of stress on California’s agricultural and natural wealth. In order to address these challenges, California has led the charge nationally to reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions, because we recognize that this battle is not only about the environment – it is also about protecting the well-being of our families and communities. To ensure the prosperous future of our State, we must shift to a more conscientious approach to land use planning in California – one that balances the needs of conservation and development. In order to balance these priorities, the State has put new laws in place for new housing and infill development, community resilience, economic growth in urban and rural areas, and set an ambitious target for carbon neutrality by 2045 that relies upon efficient and orderly growth across California.

Developed through a collaboration among the Strategic Growth Council, the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research and the California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions (CALAFCO), this paper is intended to help support coordination among local entities to advance efficient growth and conservation of natural resources. The document highlights case studies in which LAFCos, cities, counties and special districts successfully partnered to reduce suburban sprawl and increase the conservation of natural and working lands, while also considering how to improve community resilience. It also aims to raise awareness of available tools and resources that can be used to create more environmentally and economically sustainable communities throughout California.

California, State of. “AnnouncementCreating Sustainable Communities and Landscapes: Recommended Practices and Tools for Local Collaboration on Climate-Smart Growth.” CA.gov, Strategic Growth Council, 8 Oct. 2018, www.sgc.ca.gov/news/2018/10-08.html.

Read the paper by clicking here.

Renewal of Measure U in Sacramento

September 10, 2018

The Environmental Council of Sacramento (ECOS) has submitted a letter in response to the renewal of Measure U in Sacramento. The content of the letter is below.

Dear Mayor and City Council:

The Environmental Council of Sacramento (ECOS) agrees with the concerns about the renewal of Measure U expressed in a recent letter from neighborhood groups and their supporters to the Sacramento City Council. We are also concerned that a permanent extension of the City’s local sales tax measure (Measure U) without significant changes in community engagement, budget process, and oversight will mean that City residents who will pay this tax will have no way to ensure that the funds collected are used for the greatest and most equitable community benefit.

ECOS generally supports the four proposals outlined in the letter submitted from the neighborhood groups:

  1. There should be meaningful comminity engagement for all plans and pending decisions that represents our diverse communities. This process should begin well before a final plan or decision is released, and all comments and documents received in that engagement should be publicly available. Engagement should prioritize low-income communities and communities of color.
  2. Once per year, with the annual budget, the City should conduct an assessment of the impact on disadvantaged communities by the previous year spending and proposed spending for the next fiscal year.
  3. The City should implement a participatory budgeting process to get meaningful public input on the spending that will be proposed for each annual budget. This process must conclude before any final budget is proposed for the next fiscal year and include meaningful community engagement. Any final recommendations should include a racial impact assessment of proposed spending.
  4. There should be meaningful citizen budget oversight through a citizen oversight committee that has the ability to convene meetings when the committee deems necessary and to provide recommendations to the City on budget spending and proposals.

We request that the City Council take formal action to adopt these requests before the November election. We look forward to working with you to institute these long-needed changes to the City’s planning and budget process.

Sincerely,
Ralph Propper
ECOS President

To access the letter in PDF, click here.