Comments re Sacramento’s Transportation Priorities Plan

On March 14, 2022, ECOS, along with several other environmental groups, submitted a letter to the City of Sacramento about the City’s Transportation Priorities Plan.

Once again, we write to implore you to act swiftly to take comprehensive and bold action to transform transportation in the City and the region. Such a transformation is nonnegotiable if we are to begin to respond to the imminent threat of climate change; it is also essential in fostering equity, addressing traffic safety, increasing the livability of our neighborhoods, and improving air quality.

Just a few weeks ago the Council held a workshop titled Climate and Transportation. Yet the Transportation Priorities Plan before you, which proposes analyzing 700 transportation projects that have been proposed by council members over the past twenty years, would appear to adopt the status quo and does not establish addressing climate change as one of the criteria. Our city is in dire need of a transportation plan that reflects the current century. Again, we urge you to direct your City Manager to set aside staff and resources to develop and implement a comprehensive active transportation and public transit framework for the city.

Click here to read our letter in full.

Want to help improve transportation in Sacramento?

Do you walk, bike or roll using a wheelchair or mobility scooter? Or if you don’t, do you have thoughts on how to make transportation more effective?
Would you like to help improve our sidewalks, bikeways, crosswalks and access to transit?

If the answer is yes, here’s your opportunity to help.

The City of Sacramento is looking for community members to apply to be part of one of the three Sacramento Active Streets community planning teams.

The three planning teams will focus on North Sacramento, Fruitridge/Broadway and South Sacramento areas.

“Each plan will identify locations to improve walking, biking, and access to transit – like sidewalks, crosswalks, bike lanes and more,” said Leslie Mancebo, the City’s transportation planner. “A critical part of the planning process will be community engagement, and we are currently putting together these community planning teams to serve as local experts/advisors throughout the process.”

The City’s Active Streets plans are designed to improve safety and comfort for walking, biking, rolling and accessing transit.

Members of the community planning teams will advise City staff throughout the process to ensure that community voices and priorities are heard. As a member of a community planning Ttam, selected participants will be responsible for:

  • Attending up to seven approximately one-hour meetings between March 2022 and June 2023
  • Suggesting opportunities for community engagement events (e.g., farmers markets, school resource fairs, etc.)
  • Helping spread the word about the plans and about ways to get involved
  • Advising City staff to ensure voices of all residents are captured in the plan
  • Each planning team member will receive a $75 gift card for each meeting attended.

Those interested in applying can do so on the City’s website. Applications close March 4.

A new transportation sales tax? Come learn more Nov 4

The principal topic for ECOS’s Transportation, Air Quality and Climate Change Committee (TAQCC) meeting this Thursday, Nov. 4th will be will be an effort led by the Sacramento business community to put a transportation sales tax measure on the November 2022 ballot using a citizens initiative process. We understand that this measure would be very similar to Measure A+ prepared by the Sacramento Transportation Authority (STA) in 2020 but withdrawn before the election, and would require only a simple majority for passage. Roger Dickinson and Steve Cohn will provide us with details about this initiative.

Link to join this Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85805612058
To phone in: 669 900 6833, Meeting ID: 858 0561 2058

Click here for the agenda.

In addition, Susan Herre (ECOS President-Elect) will present a proposed reorganization of ECOS committees, with the goal of making ECOS a more effective organization.


Image from https://www.publicdomainpictures.net/en/view-image.php?image=382425&picture=clouds-sky-blue-cumulus

in distant photo of tree on landscape field

Protect Folsom Oaks — Immediate Action Needed

PG&E plans to remove (Clearcut) a number of mature Oak Trees in the powerline corridors next to walking and biking paths. Over 300 trees in all (Oaks and others) Work is scheduled to start on NOVEMBER 1. Many of these Oak Trees are in the Oak Avenue Parkway (The Bike Trail Corridor) between Natoma Street and Blue Ravine – leading to BT Collins Park. The Corridor also extends across portions of the City and into American River Canyon. Some trees are on Private Property, some on City Land and some on PG&E property. In July 2020 PG&E clearcut a number of mature oaks near St. Johns without any Notice to the City or the Public. It appears PG&E is ready to Clear Cut the rest of the Corridor. NOTE – the plan and documents provided by PG&E are not clear, so more information is needed by the City and the Public – Before Removal can Occur.

CITY COUNCIL MEETING – THIS TUESDAY OCTOBER 26 AT 6:00 pm. – City Council Chambers 50 Natoma Street – Folsom

Click here for more info.

Elk Grove CNU Hospital Vote: February 18, 2021

Posted February 11, 2021

The California Northstate University Hospital/Wet Lab project is going for a recommendation at the Planning Commission meeting on February 18, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. 

Are you worried about the impacts the CNU Wetlab/Hospital Project would have on our community and surrounding wildlife?
➡️ Contact the City of Elk Grove Planning Commission. Voice your concerns about the project to City Planning officials, using the prefilled email on the Responsible Elk Grove website.
➡️ Sign up for email updates at bit.ly/REG-email-signups.
➡️ Engage and share the updates on our Facebook page.
Learn more at ResponsibleElkGrove.org.

We need folks to submit comments about this poorly planned hospital development. To learn more about our concerns, click here.