ECOS Board Meeting July 23rd

At this meeting, we will hear from Special Assistant Julia Burrows, the new senior policy advisor to Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg. She will share with us some insight into how the City of Sacramento is currently handling environmental concerns. This is also a chance to raise issues of which we think their office ought to be aware. Click here to learn more about Julia Burrows.

Date: Tuesday, July 23rd

Time: Reception is at 5:30 pm (feel free to bring something to share) and the meeting begins at 6:00 pm

Location: The meeting will be held in the Sierra Club CA conference room on the second floor of the Breathe CA building, at 909 12th Street, Sacramento. Ring the buzzer for Sierra Club to be let in. Street parking is difficult, but lightrail stops right by the office and there is secure bike parking inside the building.

Click here to see the agenda.

We look forward to seeing everyone!

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Never mind those earthquakes: Atmospheric rivers could put Sacramento 30 feet under water

July 9, 2019
Candice Wang
The Sacramento Bee

The biggest freshwater rivers on Earth don’t flow along the planet’s surface.

Instead, they surge and whip through the atmosphere thousands of feet above our heads, carrying 2½ times the amount of water that gushes through the Amazon River at any given time.

They’re called atmospheric rivers, or, more aptly, rivers in the sky.

These rivers are capable of burying Sacramento under 30 feet of water.

A research team led by Sasha Gershunov at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego published a new study on atmospheric rivers in Nature Scientific Reports this week that places atmospheric rivers under scrutiny as the driving cause behind California’s increasingly extreme, infrequent bouts of precipitation.

Gershunov’s team used 16 global climate models to analyze the expanding role of atmospheric rivers as contributors to precipitation in California. The results show that atmospheric rivers are getting stronger and wetter, and catastrophic events like the Great Flood of 1862 could happen again.

Read more here.

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