Sacramento County: Free Your Recycling

November 2019

Many plastic food and beverage containers can be placed in your curbside recycling cart. The County’s curbside recycling program accepts plastics #1 – #7, with the exception of Styrofoam…As long as the plastic item has a #1 – #7 stamped on it, usually on the bottom or side, and located within the “chasing arrows” symbol, it is ok to put in your recycling cart.

Plastic bags are a little different. Thin, stretchy plastic, like zip-lock bags, single-use grocery bags, bubble wrap and air pillows used for packaging, are not accepted in your curbside recycling cart. However, some local businesses do accept these items for recycling. Visit the Plastic Film Recycling website to find a nearby drop-off location. And, please remember: if you bag your recyclables, do not put the bag in the recycling cart. Empty the recyclables into your cart, reuse the bag, or toss it in the garbage cart.*

https://www.saccounty.net/news/latest-news/Pages/On-America-Recycles-Day-Some-Tips-About-Plastic-.aspx

*”Free Your Recycling!”

Click here to read the full post from Sacramento County, including more information about best recycling practices in the County.

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Metropolitan Transportation Plan Update

On November 7, 2019, the Environmental Council of Sacramento (ECOS) submitted comments on the recently proposed update to our region’s Metropolitan Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (MTP/SCS). These comments were submitted via one letter solely from ECOS, and a joint letter from both ECOS and 350 Sacramento. Below is an excerpt from our comments, followed by links to PDFs of both letters.

The Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG) has put forth a sophisticated Metropolitan Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (MTP/SCS), a regional plan that the region’s jurisdictions should follow. While this regional plan is not a strong as we feel it could be, the 2020 MTP/SCS is a viable strategy for the region to meet its regional greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets mandated by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) per Senate Bill 375 (2008).

The plan represents a reasonable compromise between what the region could accomplish if the political will existed, and the reality of much more expansive car-oriented, low-density growth that is actually being actively pursued by some of the region’s jurisdictions on the ground. ECOS would prefer a greater percentage of transportation investment to non-auto modes, and a much more compact land use footprint than proposed. The Sacramento region is not meeting its mandated GHG reduction targets because local jurisdictions are not complying with the strategy that SACOG has laid out for them, and the State must do more to ensure compliance of local authorities to our Sustainable Community Strategies, as well as to ensure the State’s own investments are aligned with its climate laws.

Click here to read the comment letter by ECOS on the MTP/SCS.

Click here to read the comment letter by ECOS and 350 Sacramento on the Climate Change section of the MTP/SCS, which was submitted separately.

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LA proposes putting ‘anti-displacement’ zones around luxury development

It’s aimed at helping renters in a one-mile radius around new buildings

By Bianca Barragan
November 13, 2019
Curbed LA

The proposal stems from a motion introduced by Councilmember Herb Wesson, Jr.
In his motion, Wesson says that while luxury and market-rate projects are “designed to strengthen” a neighborhood’s economy, many times they have negative consequences for long-time residents, especially when they’re located in neighborhoods that sustained decades of disinvestment resulting from racist housing covenants and redlining.
“Development projects should help to build up an area in need of economic investment so that members of a community can make use of these local amenities and improve their everyday lives,” Wesson says.

https://la.curbed.com/2019/11/13/20963844/anti-displacement-zones-los-angeles-development

Click here to read the full article.

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