Sacramento region secures $50 million for Sacramento Valley Station and Regional Transit improvements, Sacramento City Express, July 12, 2022

The city of Sacramento will see transportation improvements in the coming year after receiving $49.9 million in funding from the California State Transportation Agency’s Transit and Intercity Rail Capitol Program.

The award went to a regional partnership led by Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority (CCJPA) and its project partners, the City of Sacramento, Sacramento Regional Transit (SacRT), Downtown Railyard Ventures and Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG).

Click here to read more.

The Supreme Court Dealt a Terrible Blow to Children’s Health, NYTimes, July 9, 2022

Climate change and air pollution — both largely driven by fossil fuel emissions — inflict a huge toll on the health of children. This is especially true within low-income communities and communities of color. The recent Supreme Court decision, West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency, that curtails the E.P.A.’s power to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants will greatly exacerbate this harm.

Read the article at: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/09/opinion/environment/climate-change-supreme-court-epa-children-health.html

Q&A with Alberto Ayala, Director of Sacramento’s Air Quality District, SacTown Magazine, June 4, 2022

Alberto Ayala discusses “the growing threat of wildfire smoke, the urgent need to move away from fossil fuel engines, the “scary” results from a new study about the impact of air pollution on our brain health, and why we need to rethink transportation as we plan for a better post-pandemic world.”

On transportation:

“I wrote an essay five years ago, in which I pointed out that of the 40 biggest cities in the country, Sacramento and Las Vegas were the only two without any protected bike lanes and with no imminent plans to build them, whereas cities like New York, San Francisco and Chicago were racing to build hundreds of miles of protected bike lanes. And now five years later, we’re not much better off. And for reasons I don’t completely understand, the city just has not made that a priority when clearly, active transportation like biking and walking is going to be one of the ways that we move toward cleaner air. . . [and] where is the investment in transit? And how are we helping our public transit be the innovative transit of the future where you actually meet the needs of transportation for people?”

On the difference between ozone pollution and particle pollution:

“In Sacramento, like most urban regions, the most chronically difficult pollution problem is ozone pollution, not so much particle pollution, but clearly wildfires are changing that. Particle pollution is the smoke that you see from something like a wildfire, or the soot that comes out of a diesel truck. That black smoke is essentially a collection of these particles that come in all kinds of shapes and sizes. Ozone pollution, in contrast, is the result of nitrogen oxide and volatile organic emissions often from the combustion of fossil fuels—fuel that burns in an internal combustion engine like in a gasoline car. In the presence of sunlight, they basically cook up in the atmosphere, and then they lead to ozone, also known as smog. So the difference is here we’re talking about gases, not particles.”

Click here to read the full article.

We’ve Got to Stop Requiring Parking Everywhere, Farhad Manjoo, NYTimes, Jun 2, 2022

Now California, the state that in many ways set the standard for America’s car-dependent lifestyle, could be on the verge of reforming parking statewide. One bill moving through the state Legislature would prohibit cities from enforcing most minimum parking requirements near public transit, while a competing bill would give developers greater leeway in avoiding the rules. I hope legislators in my state adopt the former. . .

Click here to read the article: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/02/opinion/california-parking.html?smid=em-share

Ready, Set, Trails!, SACOG, May 23, 2022

May 23, 2022

VISION FOR A CONNECTED SACRAMENTO REGION

Imagine over 1,000 miles of trails connecting you to the region’s favorite destinations. Pretty cool, right?

The Sacramento Regional Trail Network will spark a new wave of walking, biking, and rolling to daily destinations throughout the region. Imagine a network of trails that makes it easy for families to ride to their favorite park, provides a safe route for children to get to school, and offers a simple way for residents to explore new corners of their neighborhoods and cities.

The network envisions reliable routes to the best places around the region for all ages, and abilities.

Click here to learn more: https://www.sacog.org/ready-set-trails