Wild and Scenic Film Festival Sacramento 2017 – Films

Check out these amazing films you can see and be inspired by at the Wild and Scenic Film Festival On Tour in Sacramento 2017!

Thursday, September 28th, 2017. Doors Open at 6:00 pm, Films run from 6:30 pm-9:30 pm
24th Street Theater at the Sierra 2 Community Center (2791 24th St, Sacramento, CA 95818)

Click here to learn more about the festival and to buy tickets.


The Wild President

President Jimmy Carter, an unsung environmental hero, grew up in awe of natures wonder. But it wasn’t until he first paddled the Chattooga Rivers Bull Sluice did he understand the power of a wild river. In celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act, happening in 2018, President Carter urges all Americans to protect more wild rivers.


Under Cover

Leng Ouch risked his life when he went undercover to expose illegal logging and government corruption that was rampant in Cambodia.


Growing Change

Jim Cochran arrived at work before dawn. He walked out into the strawberry fields. As the sun rose and light hit the field, he began to smell chemicals. His eyes watered. His head spun. He started to shake. He had just walked into a field that had been sprayed with pesticides. From this experience, Jim Cochran helped invent the organic strawberry industry. After pioneering and profiting from a healthier crop, he turned his attention to the health of his workers.


A Ghost in the Making: Searching for the Rusty-patched Bumble Bee

Everyone has heard about bee declines, but with so much attention focused on domesticated honeybees, someone has to speak up for the 4,000 species of native bees in North America. Natural history photographer Clay Bolt is on a multi-year quest to tell the stories of our native bees, and one elusive species the Rusty-patched Bumble Bee has become his white whale.


Destiny’s Bay

Destiny Watford organized her classmates to prevent construction of the nations largest incinerator in a Baltimore neighborhood less than one mile from their high school.


Selah: Water from Stone

Nearly Fifty Years ago David Bamberger went public with Church’s Chicken and used the capital to purchase 5,500 acres of overgrazed land that was considered some of the poorest acreage in the Texas Hill Country. He devoted the rest of his life to restoring it. David cleared overgrown woody vegetation, allowed native grasses to grow, and literally created Water from Stone. The grasses soaked in rains, took moisture into the porous rock below, and filled hillside aquifers instead of running off. There was only one spring when he bought the place, now there are eleven. There were only 48 species of birds on the first bird count, in 2014 they counted 238 species. His example of land stewardship has been replicated across the region and he’s considered a visionary in land management and water conservation.


The Living Forest

The Kichwa tribe in the Sarayaku region of the Amazon in Ecuador believe in the living forest, where humans, animals and plants live in harmony. They are fighting oil companies who want to exploit their ancestral land. A delegation of indigenous people are at the Paris COP21 climate conference to make sure their voices are heard. Can they win their battle?


The Elwha Undammed: What’s a River For?

The Elwha River in Port Angeles, Washington is the stage for the largest dam removal in American history. A century ago, a businessman dammed the waters of the Klallam people where 100-pound salmon cast their shadows. Behind the dynamite and bulldozers that erased Thomas Aldwellâ’s dream is a saga of competing ideas about the purpose and meaning of a river.


Think Like a Scientist: Gorongosa

This is the story of Greg Carr and his involvement in the restoration of Gorongosa National Park after its destruction from 30 years of war in Mozambique. The film also features Princeton biologist Rob Pringle, who does research in the park. 


A Walk in the Park

Follow Kelly Halpin on the type of ‘Picnic’ that only a Jackson Hole resident can concoct. A human-powered natural obstacle course, The Picnic route includes 42 miles of biking, 2.6 miles of swimming, and 6,000 feet of elevation gain while hiking.


Plastico

Beach communities around the world suffer from an abundance of plastic that tragically ends up in the oceans at an alarming rate over 8 million metric tons per year. Join the founders of the Azulita Project, as they share information on how a small community is making a difference.


My Haggan Dream

On the island of Saipan, a young girls mysterious dream about a haggan, or green sea turtle, leads her to investigate the sea turtles that live around her home. Join her adventure to find turtles, which leads to a wonderful birthday wish.

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