Jonathan K. London at ECOS Board Meeting – highlights

Professor Jonathan K. London of the Center for Regional Change at UC Davis spoke to ECOS at our September 18th Board Meeting about their work on Environmental Justice. The Center for Regional Change has grown into a well-known policy-oriented research organization that aims to create linkages between the university and the region of which it is a part.

Professor London presented several tactics for how an organization such as the ECOS coalition can do more to help improve social equity in the Sacramento region. London directed us to get to know the Center for Regional Change’s report called “Capitalizing Environmental Justice in the Sacramento Region.” The report assesses the dire conditions of environmental injustice confronting low-income communities and communities of color in California’s Capital Region. However, local residents and regional leaders have begun to develop a cohesive framework for action to improve conditions in their communities, and to contribute to the region’s burgeoning Environmental Justice movement.

London reminded us of the plethora of information offered by CalEnviroScreen, including some analyses done by the Center for Regional Change on mapping pollution levels and drinking water contamination in the Sacramento region.

London also highlighted a tool called “IVAN” (Identifying Violations Affecting Neighborhoods). IVAN is an Environmental Monitoring System that connects the community with real people that can help solve local environmental problems.

The presentation emphasized the importance of environmental injustices to people living in rural areas and engaging them in environmental advocacy work. Connecting with neighborhoods, working to help bolster affordable housing options and joining food justice efforts are all also effective.

ECOS members in attendance were appreciative of the presentation, its cutting-edge research and the new tools for advocacy with which we left. Thank you to Jonathan K. London!

You can suggest future speakers to present to ECOS by emailing our office at office [at] ecosacramento [dot] net.

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South Sac Habitat Conservation Plan – Final Comments from ECOS

What is the South Sac Habitat Conservation Plan?

Comments from ECOS

September 5, 2017

Attention: Rich Radmacher, Senior Planner
Sacramento County Planning Department
827 7th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

Delivered via email to: radmacherr [at] saccounty [dot] net

These comments on the public draft of the South Sacramento Habitat Conservation Plan are presented on behalf of the Environmental Council of Sacramento (ECOS), Habitat 2020, the Sierra Club, the Institute for Ecological Health, and Save Our Sandhill Cranes.

Issues addressed by these comments include:

  • long-term sustainability of vernal pool resources in our region
  • agricultural-residential development
  • effects of pesticide use on agricultural preserve lands
  • effects of artifical lighting on species covered by the plan, as well as the insect prey of those species
  • effects of rodenticides on various species
  • better monitoring of how species are doing
  • avoidance and minimization measures
  • available inventory (in acres) remaining for each cover type/habitat type in the Plan Area
  • the regular review of relevant new scientific studies and reports for applicability in Preserve management

Animals of special concern include:

  • various local species of raptors (birds of prey) including the Burrowing Owl, the White Tailed Kite and the Swainson’s Hawk
  • the American Badger
  • the Loggerhead Shrike (a “songbird with a raptor’s habits”)
  • the Greater Sandhill Crane (which has one of the longest fossil histories of any bird still in existence)
  • the Tricolored Blackbird
  • the Western Red Bat

Read Our Comments

Click here to read the full comment letter.

Corresponding Addendum to our letter:

Addendum 1- 3

Addendum 4

Addendum 5, Part 1

Addendum 5, Part 2

Addendum 5, Part 3

More Resources

Click here to learn more about the South Sacramento Habitat Conservation Plan

Click here for a glossary of terms used in and in relation to the South Sacramento Habitat Conservation Plan

Click here to learn more about the Sandhill Crane

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Sacramento eyes new transportation tax, but are residents willing to pay?

By Tony Bizjak

September 7, 2017

The Sacramento Bee

Proponents say they misfired with the local transportation tax measure last year because they didn’t take enough time to reach the public early on and to get vocal grass-roots support.

“The criticism from groups was that the process was too truncated and not inclusive enough,” said Sacramento City Councilman Jay Schenirer.

Read the article here.


Note: the Environmental Council of Sacramento believes that the last transportation tax proposal, Measure B, allocated far too much for new road construction and far too little for transit. Click here to read the letter ECOS submitted about this last measure.

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