Lifecycle of Local Soil – from Restaurant, to Compost, to Farm

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When:
December 7, 2017 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
2017-12-07T17:30:00-08:00
2017-12-07T19:30:00-08:00
Where:
Hot Italian Pizza & Panini Bar
1627 16th St, Sacramento, CA 95814
USA

One week from today is our last event of the year: Lifecycle of Local Soil – from Restaurant, to Compost, to Farm.

December 7th, 5:30-7:30, Hot Italian (1627 16th Street)
This event is part of California Soils Week.
An amazing line-up of speakers, great food, and great networking. Please RSVP through EventBrite so we have a headcount for food – the event is free!
RSVP link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sacramento-food-policy-council-quarter-4-meeting-lifecycle-of-local-soil-tickets-40010511517?aff=utm_source%3Deb_email%26utm_medium%3Demail%26utm_campaign%3Dnew_event_email&utm_term=eventurl_text

All our welcome to join, including new members who have never attended a Sacramento Food Policy Council (SFPC) event – so spread the word: Facebook event.

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Speaker & Panel Lineup:

Speakers:
Andrea Lepore, co-founder of Hot Italian, will explain why they compost their food scraps and the importance of feeding their food waste back to the community growing food. We’ll also tour their worm bin!

Jessica Chiartas, founder of Soil Life, will give an overivew of how we all relate to soil – in urban and rural settings, and why healthy soil is so important for our health, envionment, and climate.

Panel Discussion: a Chef, a Composter, and a Farmer

Suleka Sun-Lindley, Executive Chef of Thai Basil. Thai Basil Restaurant in Midtown Sacramento has won “BEST THAI” every year since its opening in 2001. Chef Suleka is passionate about using fresh, wholesome, local ingredients while promoting business practices that respect the environment.

David Baker, Co-Founder of GRAS and the ReSoil Sacramento Program. ReSoil is a call to action to the Sacramento Community to use our organic resources to grow organic gardens and build climate resilient, regenerative landscapes. ReSoil Sacramento collecst/diverts 21,000 lbs/month from restaurants and other community partners, that go to feed urban agriculture.

Timonthy Chapman, Farm Coordinator for the New Roots refugee farm in West Sacramento. 23 gardeners are currently growing traditional and ethnic crops on a little over 2 acres of land. Most of the produce is taken for home consumption with a recent partnership with the Sacramento Food Bank and Farmily Services to start a CSA.

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Lifecycle of Local Soil – from Restaurant, to Compost, to Farm